Latest Posts Under: Craftmanship

At the end of 2011 I started organizing a coderetreat. It started on twitter around October. I’ve also posted about it in my last mini blog. The original event can be found here. If anyone was interested, they could sign up (max 25 people) for free. All you needed to do was bring your best humor and if possible a laptop with your preferred dev environment set up. (Its not hard to organize one, check here if you’re interested) If you want to know more about what a coderetreat is, click here. Even better: join… Read Article →

I’ve visited JFall, a conference held by the NLJUG (Dutch Java User Group), at 2 november 2011. In this blog I’d like to share my experiences of this conference. This was my first time at this conference and I pretty much had no expectations. There was a lot to go to; I have visited the following seemingly interesting topics: – Keynote – Java 7 Directors Cut – Overthere – Design and implementation of a Java Remote File and Execution framework – Hands on lab – Clojure – A gentle introduction to a brilliant language –… Read Article →

Recently I have been experimenting with a Code Kata, and in this post I’d like to share my experiences with it. Code Kata? Code Kata’s have been around for a while, but it really came into my attention while reading Chapter 6 from the book The Clean Coder by Robert C Martin. This chapter makes an anology that at your work you’re a performer like a musician and outside work you (should be, like a musician) practicing. (Of course, you will learn while at work, but that is not the point). But what is a… Read Article →

In one of my previous posts I blogged about refactoring I did for my hobby project. Robert C Martin has a nice video showing refactoring, using IntelliJ. Watch it here. You can also see why unit testing is so important, as with each change the unit tests are being ran in order to check if anything got broken.

Not too long ago, Martin Fowler pointed out a nice blog post by Jay Fields. Jay Fields refers to a nice talk he had about accidental complexity and essential complexity and how this has impact on your estimates. He found that not all developers consider the accidental complexity and therefor have lower estimates. I found this a very interesting thought. It got me thinking how I estimate and how far I’m off. I found that, especially with larger solutions, I’m most of the time under estimating. Even with more complex things, and adding some ‘unforseen… Read Article →

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